International conventions

  1. UN Convention against Corruption
    In December 2000, the UN General Assembly decided to establish a special committee open to all States for drawing up an effective international legal instrument against corruption (Resolution 55/61). The committee negotiated the Convention between January 2002 and October 2003.
    For more information on this convention go to the following link:
    http://www.unodc.org/documents/treaties/UNCAC/Publications/Convention/08-50026_E.pdf

  2. OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions
    The OECD Anti-Bribery Convention establishes legally binding standards to criminalize bribery of foreign public officials in international business transactions and provides for a host of related measures that make this effective. The 30 OECD member countries and eight non-member countries - Argentina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, Estonia, Israel, the Slovenia and South Africa - have adopted this Convention.
    For more information on this convention go to the following link:
    http://www.oecd.org/document/21/0,3343,en_2649_34859_2017813_1_1_1_1,00.html

  3. African Union Convention on Combating and Fighting against corruption
    The African Union Convention on Preventing and Combating Corruption (AU Convention) was adopted in Maputo on 11 July 2003. It represents regional consensus on what African states should do in the areas of prevention, criminalization, international cooperation and asset recovery.
    For more information on that convention go to the following link:
    http://www.africa-union.org/root/au/Documents/Treaties/Text/Convention%20on%20Combating%20Corruption.pdf

  4. The EU convention against corruption involving officials
    The Convention provides that Member States must ensure that conduct constituting an act of passive or active corruption, as well as participating in and instigating these acts, is punishable by criminal penalties. In serious cases, these could include penalties involving deprivation of liberty which can give rise to extradition. In addition, Member States must take the necessary measures to allow heads of businesses or any persons having power to take decisions or exercise control within a business to be declared criminally liable in cases of active corruption by a person under their authority acting on behalf of the business.
    For more information on that convention go to the following link:
    http://europa.eu/legislation_summaries/fight_against_fraud/fight_against_corruption/l33027_en.htm

 

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